BUFFET – a food waste initiative

  • Default Size
  • Decrease Text
  • Increase Text

Do you have an appetite for a BUFFET?

Building on the success of the United Nation’s International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development (IY2017) initiative and in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), PATA, along with our project partner Scholars of Sustenance Thailand (Thai-SOS) and knowledge partner Futouris, is launching the BUFFET Campaign to raise awareness of food waste in our industry to drive positive change.

This website aims to provide you with more information and resources about reducing food waste within your organisation. Although this work is geared towards the hospitality sector, it can also be relevant towards other tourism sectors that have food and beverage operations.

There are many ways to reduce your food waste to landfill. Choose what works for you.

If you need assistance, we are ready to help!

Read more about why we’ve chosen to tackle food waste in our industry.

DOWNLOAD THE BUFFET TOOLKIT

 

Organisational buy-in

• Make a business case
• Develop a policy
• Involve staff

Don’t know where to start

• Measure it
• Create a waste map

Too much food waste

• Optimise procurement and inventory management
• Streamline deliveries

Preparation waste

• Managing food prep

Overproduction

• Considering types of service
• Managing a buffet

Plate scrapings

• Portion control
• Service and presentation
• Communicating with guests

What to do with waste

• Rescue, reuse and redistribution
• Contact lawmakers
• Establish networks

 

ENGAGE

PROJECT PARTNER

 

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER

 

SUPPORTERS

                   

About BUFFET

The BUFFET (Building an Understanding For Food Excess in Tourism) Initiative is about bringing together a coalition of industry partners and PATA members to create and implement a campaign that challenges our industry, particularly the hospitality sector, to reduce food waste to landfill.

The main activities in this initiative include the raising awareness of food waste in our industry and the creation of Asia-Pacific focused resources for hoteliers and other hospitality and tourism professionals to drive positive change and ultimately reduce their food waste to landfill.

While this initiative aims to impact our industry at large, will be focusing additional efforts on hotels and F&B providers in Asia, and specific hotel properties in Bangkok in our Bangkok Hotels Project.

This website aims to provide you with more information and resources about reducing food waste within your organisation. Although this work is geared towards the hospitality sector, it can also be relevant towards other tourism sectors that have food and beverage operations.

There are many ways to reduce your food waste to landfill. Choose what works for you. If you need assistance, we are ready to help!

Read more about why we’ve chosen to tackle food waste in our industry.

DOWNLOAD THE BUFFET TOOLKIT


The BUFFET Initiative aims to directly address 4 of the 17 SDGs:

 

Goal 2: Zero Hunger
End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

This program would address Goal 2 by redirecting quality excess food through the campaign initiatives.

 

Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
Ensure sustainable consumption & production patterns

This program would address Goal 12 by providing awareness and tools to properties that show how curbing food waste can also positively impact the (triple) bottom line. It would encourage tourism businesses to implement, evaluate, and mainstream SCP practices and strategies that contribute to sustainable growth and development.

 

Goal 13: Climate Action
Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

This program addresses Goal 13 by diverting food waste to landfill, resulting in a reduction of methane and carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere.

 

Goal 17: Partnerships for the Goals
Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development

This initiative can only be accomplished through partnerships and solidarity in the hospitality sector.

 

Why we’ve chosen to tackle food waste in our industry?

The hospitality industry in many parts of the world, and especially in the Asia Pacific, is expected to see significant growth in the next five years. Between 2016-2017, growth is expected to be just under 6%, from around 595 million IVAs in 2016 to an expected 630 million IVAs in 2017. This number is expected to climb to 760 in 2021 (PATA, 2017: ‘Asia Pacific: Visitor Forecasts 2017-2021’). With greater growth, greater waste can be implied, and “more waste usually translates into a greater environmental footprint and therefore more harm to the ecosystem. For example, a hotel guest is estimated to generate up to 1kg of waste per day on average” (Pirani and Arafat, 2014, p.320).

With increasing concern of the world for climate change, food waste has come increasingly under attention in recent years and for good reason:

Right now 842 million people do not have enough to eat and with an estimated world population of 9.8 billion people in 2050 resources will be limited and more people will be hungry (UN, 2017).

When food gets thrown away and rots it releases methane, which is (21 times) more devastating to the environment than carbon dioxide, but that is not all: every time food is wasted, all the money, packaging, manpower, and water are wasted too, all along the supply chain (Green Hotelier [ITP], 2014).

This problem is especially visible in the hospitality industry as billions of meals are served per year to tourists in restaurants and hotels.

According to WRAP (2014), in the UK, food waste in hotels can cost up to £0.52 (US$0.68) per meal, and that 75% of the wasted food can be repurposed. Also, the average hotel guest produces 1kg of waste per night (Green Hotelier [ITP], 2014). The impact in this sector is immense, but that also means that we can make a big positive change in this industry. Reducing food waste will reduce the cost for operators in the industry while benefiting the environment at the same time. (Read more about the business case for reducing food loss and waste [Champions 12.3, 2017]).

The impact in this sector is immense, but that also means that we can make a big positive change in this industry. Reducing food waste will reduce the cost for operators in the industry while benefiting the environment at the same time.

The UN has designated 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development (IY2017). In recognition of the IY2017 initiative and in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), PATA, along with our project partner Scholars of Sustenance Thailand (Thai-SOS) and knowledge partner Futouris, is launching the BUFFET (Building an Understanding For Food Excess in Tourism) Campaign to raise awareness of food waste in our industry to drive positive change.

Food waste is “food discarded as part of operations in the hospitality sector… Food waste can further be divided into avoidable (food that is eaten by some but not by others, or a single type of food that may or may not be waste depending on how it was prepared) and unavoidable waste. The avoidable and possibly unavoidable waste may, therefore, be considered to be edible” (Parfitt et al., 2010 in Pirani and Arafat, 2014, p.321).

“Food and drink waste in hospitality and food service can be:

  • Ingredients;
  • Produce;
  • Leftover food on or in customers’ plates or glasses;
  • Unused partially-prepared food;
  • Unused fully-prepared food
  • Peelings and preparation wastes; and
  • Waste in bins and waste to the sewer (liquids).

(UNEP, 2014, p.122)

Wasting food also implies the wastage of the resources used to create and deliver the food. This includes but is not limited to the water used to grow the food, the oil used to transport the food, and the labour and energy used to prepare the food (WRAP, 2014; Green Hotelier [ITP], 2014; Pirani and Arafat, 2014). It is estimated that worldwide, 30-50% (1.2-2 billion tonnes) of food is lost before reaching the human stomach (Pirani and Arafat, 2014).

About 95% of a restaurant’s general waste could typically be recycled or composted (Nielsen and Green Restaurant Association, 2004; Pirani and Arafat, 2014).

This website aims to provide you with more information and resources about reducing food waste within your organization. Although this work is geared towards the hospitality sector, it can also be relevant towards other tourism sectors that have food and beverage operations.

There are many ways to reduce your food waste to landfill. Choose what works for you. If you need assistance, we are ready to help!

Challenges & Solutions

We recognise that there are many challenges and barriers to implementing food waste reduction practices in hospitality and food and beverage operations. Perhaps implementing such changes are too expensive, or there is a lack of space; perhaps the infrastructure in your property or municipality is not conducive to reducing food waste to landfill, or perhaps you simply don’t know where to start.

There are indeed many ways to tackle reduce food waste in hospitality F&B operations – go with what works for you.

This resource presents some possible solutions to challenges you may face when working to reduce food waste. If you have further questions or need assistance getting started, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help!

The food waste management hierarchy shows food waste management options in order of most to least environmentally and economically favourable.

VIEW FOOD WASTE MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST DOWNLOAD THE BUFFET TOOLKIT

 

Would you like to engage with us on the BUFFET Initiative?

Complete this form and leave us a message below:

Bangkok Hotels Project

According to the Thailand Department of Pollution Control, each person in Thailand throws away an average of 1.14kg of trash per day. Much of that can be avoided; 64% of Thailand’s landfills is food waste.

Food waste in landfills produces a large amount of methane – a more powerful greenhouse gas than even CO2. The uninitiated excess amounts of greenhouse are absorbed through infrared radiation and heat up the earth’s atmosphere, causing global warming and climate change.

Shockingly, if food waste were a country, it would be the third largest greenhouse gas emitter, behind China & the USA.

In Thailand, 8.5% of the population is struggling with hunger. This is why PATA is partnering with Scholars of Sustenance Thailand (Thai-SOS) to work with Bangkok hotels to reduce Bangkok’s food waste to landfill. Thai-SOS is a food rescue foundation that collects surplus food from commercial outlets and delivers it, direct and free of charge, to communities in need.

As one of the main activities in this programme, we will be working with Bangkok area hotels to develop case studies, which will involve benchmarking food waste, conducting in-house food waste management workshops, implementing good practices, and monitoring and evaluating the results of applying food rescue practices.

Managing food waste at a hotel has been shown to positively impact a property’s triple bottom line by not only reducing kitchen-related costs but also reducing a property’s negative impact on the environment, while potentially increasing its positive impact on the community in which it operates.

If your Bangkok property would like to participate in this initiative, exclusive only to PATA members, please contact:
• PATA: Chi Lo, Sustainability & Social Responsibility Specialist: chi@pata.org
• Thai-SOS: Abigail Smith, Chief Operations Officer: abigail.smith@scholarsofsustenance.org


By participating, you will receive at no cost:
• Training for your staff on how to measure and manage food waste
• Guidance on benchmarking waste and implementing food waste reduction practices
• Guidance on how to continually monitor the reduction of food waste on your bottom line.

In return, we ask that you contribute to our study by participating in an interview and sharing the results of your benchmarking and workshop with us. The results of the study will be compiled into a report detailing the status of food waste in the hospitality industry in the Asia Pacific region.

We look forward to welcoming you on board this initiative to make a positive impact on both the environment and for the people in Thailand.


Stay tuned for results from this project!

Getting a seat at the table and becoming involved in this initiative is as easy as pie – no reservations are required.
Contact us at ssr@pata.org for more information.


PROJECT PARTNER

 

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER

 

SUPPORTERS

                   

By the end of 2021, the number of International Visitor Arrivals (IVAs) to Asia Pacific is expected to reach 785 million annually (PATA, 2017: ‘Asia Pacific: Visitor Forecasts 2017-2021’). With greater growth, greater waste can be implied, and “more waste usually translates into a greater environmental footprint and therefore more harm to the ecosystem.” (Pirani and Arafat, 2014, p.320).

A BUFFET for Youth is a challenge for the next generation of tourism leaders that builds on the PATA BUFFET Campaign – a PATA food waste initiative. This challenge is at the crossroads of where young tourism students and the issue of food waste meet to create a future of sustainable production and consumption.

Calling all PATA Youth Student members, let’s get crackin’!


ABOUT THE BUFFET FOR YOUTH CHALLENGE

RESERVATION REQUIREMENTS

PATA Youth members are encouraged to form teams (maximum 4 people per team).

All team members must be

  • between the ages of 18-35
  • enrolled in an educational institution that is a PATA International member
  • and/or, at least one member of the team is a PATA YTP student member in good standing.

Relevant personnel at the educational institution should be informed prior to team registration and a lecturer/professor is required to act as an advisor for the team (the advisor is not included as a team member).

Teams are required to “make a reservation” and register before April 18, 2018. Registration opens on March 14, 2018.

MAKE A RESERVATION RESOURCE LIBRARY


THE BUFFET FOR YOUTH MENU

In this first course, the teams are asked to participate in an informational webinar and choose a specific issue to address regarding food waste on campus.

Dates & Details:

April 25: Informational webinar conducted by PATA & Thai-SOS.

This webinar will provide an introduction to the food waste pandemic in our industry, as well as an introduction to the PATA BUFFET Initiative. Speakers will discuss each course of the BUFFET for Youth Challenge in more detail as well as answer any questions from the webinar participants.

May 6: Deadline to select a challenge to tackle on your campus and share on social media

Following the webinar, the teams must select one food waste challenge from the BUFFET website that they wish to execute on their campus. To show their passion towards this cause, the teams must explain the challenge they chose through an online video or post on their preferred social media channel with the following hashtags: #BUFFET4youth #PATAyouth #PATAsustain. Link(s) to the team’s social media activities must be sent to YTP@PATA.org by May 6.

MAKE A RESERVATION


In the entrée course, teams will be asked to come up with possible solutions to the food waste challenge chosen in the appetiser course. Solutions will be submitted to judges for constructive feedback.

Dates & Details:

The teams must draft two possible solutions to the challenge chosen during the “appetiser” round, including the reason for the choice, how the impact will be measured, and indicators that will be used.

June 10: Deadline to submit two possible solutions to the challenge chosen in the appetiser course.

  • The implementation plan must be able to be executed within a four-week time frame.
  • Each solution should be presented on a one-sided A4 sized fully designed flyer with graphics/images (approx. 300 words).
  • An approval letter from related individuals or stakeholders (e.g. campus catering, department Dean) to execute the BUFFET for Youth Challenge will be required upon submission.
  • Submit via this link.

Case studies and examples of food waste reduction initiatives can be found here. Solutions will be posted and shared on the PATA YTP Facebook & BUFFET Initiative web pages.

June 11 to June 15: The judging panel will provide constructive feedback for each submitted implementation plan (for a total of 2 per team).

SUBMIT


Teams will implement one of the two solutions proposed to tackle the food waste challenge submitted in the entrée course, and then present to the judges who will select finalists, and ultimately, a winner of the challenge.

Dates & Details:

Until July 22: Execute one of the two implementation plans previously developed in the entrée course.

  • Implement the plan and be sure to track daily/weekly activities and successes.
  • Submit a 3-minute video supplemented by a written report (max 600 words) illustrating the BUFFET for Youth Challenge journey. Materials submitted should describe the food waste situation on the campus before and after implementation, the challenges encountered during the process, and the impact of the project on the campus.
  • Upon review of all submitted materials, the judging panel will select and invite the top 5 teams to present the team’s chosen implementation plan via video conference.
  • Finalists will be chosen based on the impact of the project on the campus and how teams dealt with the challenges they encountered.

SUBMIT

July 23 to August 6: Review + Presentation week.

The top 5 finalists will be given 15 minutes (including the 3-minute video & 5-minute Q&A session) to showcase their complete “menu” to the judging panel.

  • Judging criteria will be based on the impact of the project (40%), innovation (15%), messaging (10%), graphics (10%), project’s ability to be replicated (10%), and potential longevity of the project, i.e. can the changes be sustained well into the future (15%). The team with the highest score will be selected as the winner of the challenge.
  • The winning team will be announced on Wednesday, Aug 8

** Late entries and submissions will not be accepted in any challenge courses.


The winning team will be invited to attend PATA Travel Mart 2018 in Langkawi, Malaysia and present their case study during the PATA Youth Symposium.

The winning case study will be published in a PATA report, and will be showcased on the PATA sustainability website, sustain.pata.org, for six months. The winning team will also receive a blog post on sustain.pata.org. This will garner global media exposure via PATA’s far-reaching communications channels. All winning team members will receive free PATA YTP Membership for one year.


  • Mario Hardy, CEO, PATA
  • Abigail Smith, COO, Thai-SOS
  • Chi Lo, Sustainability & Social Responsibility Specialist, PATA
  • JC Wong, Young Tourism Professional Ambassador, PATA
  • Veronika Forstmeier, Associate – Sustainability & Social Responsibility, PATA
  • Representatives from partnering and sponsoring organisations (TBD)

*Dates are subject to change.