VE Bulletin July: If You Don’t Measure it, You Can’t Improve it

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How do you know that the effort you put into creating a travel marketing campaign does not go down the drain? 

You have to measure it. 

Investing in measurement and getting it right is key, especially for destination marketers operating in the fiercely competitive global tourism market, with thousands of companies vying for consumers’ attention.  

However, due to the rapid advancement in tourism industry, traditional metrics such as website traffic, impressions, click-through rates and social media interactions are no longer enough. There is a need for destination marketers to move to a more effective measurement that leverages verified real-time and in-market data trusted third-party sources.

Destination DC, the lead organisation for managing, marketing, and boosting visitation for Washington, D.C. offers a successful example of using insights and more effective measurement to improve its marketing campaign. Through a data-driven, programmatic online advertising campaign, Destination DC managed to record 8,000+ total travel bookings and 33,000+ room nights, resulting in estimated hotel revenue of US$842,000 for the city.

APAC destination marketers must adapt quickly and leverage relevant traveller insights to maximise visitation and drive greater value. After all, if you can’t measure it, how can you improve it? 

Learn more about successful case studies in campaign measurement and which parameters to use in developing practical marketing campaigns in the latest PATA VE Bulletin titled ‘If You Don’t Measure it, You Can’t Improve it’ authored by ADARA, the world’s travel data co-op and leading provider of traveler intelligence for travel brands – available now on the PATA Store: 

 Download VE Bulletin July 

ABOUT THE VE BULLETIN:

The Visitor Economy (VE) Bulletin is produced by PATA on a monthly basis in partnership with third-party organisations, covering trends and developments across the Asia Pacific region. It aims to monitor the far-reaching impact of travel and tourism across national economies, in order to encourage better and more comprehensive policy responses from governments in support of the sector.