VE Bulletin October: Top Tips for Setting Up Sustainable Tourism Practices

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The magic formula for sustainable tourism is community, environment, and economy. When these three things are in balance, then we can truly say that the tourism sector is sustainable.

However in most cases today, either one or all of these factors are missing in a lot of ways, especially from the consideration of the main stakeholders. These factors are often overlooked due to economic factors or short-sighted planning, or a combination of both. Local communities living in tourism destinations are often dismissed and deprived of an equitable voice when it comes to tourism planning, missing the opportunity to reap the much-touted economic gains from tourism. 

For example, Siem Reap, one of the world’s largest religious monuments in Cambodia generates over a third of the country’s revenue at 32.8% of Cambodia’s GDP, but ironically the province remains one of the poorest in Cambodia. 

How then, can tourism lead the way for the sustainable development of the local people as well as for the industry itself?

Authored by Plastic Free Southeast Asia, a social impact business which focuses on stopping plastic pollution at the source, PATA’s latest issue of the VE Bulletin October offers a guide into how to create a more sustainable tourism business, including approaches on:

  • How tour guides and governments can take small moves to inform travellers of the host’s culture effectively
  • How the travel industry can benefit local communities economically
  • How stakeholders can make steady efforts in order to educate tourists in a meaningful way and get local communities and tourists to exist in harmony

Find out the first steps that you can take for your business as a starting point to sustainable tourism and a brighter future for everyone involved.


ABOUT THE VE BULLETIN 

The Visitor Economy (VE) Bulletin is produced by PATA on a monthly basis in partnership with third-party organisations, covering trends and developments across the Asia Pacific region. It aims to monitor the far-reaching impact of travel and tourism across national economies, in order to encourage better and more comprehensive policy response from governments in support of the sector.